Got Your Flu Shot?

As we wend our way through the winter season, everyone hopes to avoid getting the flu or a cold.  Whether you have already spent part of the holidays sniffling or have managed to dodge the bullet (so far), here is a thought that might make you feel better:  it could be worse. 

Here is a look at some of the ways Salt Lake County tried to limit the spread of epidemics and illnesses in history.   

The progression of the Spanish Flu Epidemic
November, 1918: County offices to close early during the epidemic:

Salt Lake County Commission Meeting Minutes, November 22, 1918

 

Beginning of December, 1918: 1,000 flu cases and 48 deaths; compulsory use of face masks: 

Salt Lake County Commission Meeting Minutes, December 4, 1918

 

December 18, 1918: Only two flu cases reported; moving picture shows to open again:

Salt Lake County Commission Meeting Minutes, December 18, 1918

 

In the 1930s, households with Mumps or Whooping Cough patients placed placards in their windows to warn potential visitors away:

"Mumps" sign in window. Photograph circa 1936.

House with “Whooping Cough” placard in window. Photo circa 1936.

Sources:

Three document images: Salt Lake County Commission Meeting Minutes, 1918

“Mumps” photograph: Salt Lake County Tax Appraisal Photographs, 35-460

“Whooping Cough” photograph: Salt Lake County Tax Appraisal Photographs, 16-18-477-005

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