The Husler Milling and Elevator Company

Doing research on businesses in Salt Lake County for historical or legal purposes? Maybe an ancestor owned a business during the years 1869-1961, and you would like to know more about it?

Salt Lake County Archives maintains a number of records that can provide insights in to the organization and purpose of the business, amount of taxes paid throughout the years, photographs of the building, and even a listing of the automobiles that the business owned and operated.

As an example of the number of different records that may be available for a business, we present a brief history of one business: the Husler Milling and Elevator Company.

One of the first flour mills in all of Utah Territory, the original Husler mill was established by George Husler around 1860. Later the mill was purchased by the Colorado Milling and Elevator Company. As a branch of  Colorado Milling, it incorporated in September of 1911, under the name of the Husler Milling and Elevator Company.

Articles of Incorp Husler Flour004

Articles of Incorporation from the Incorporation Case Files, filed September 20, 1911.

Articles of Incorp Husler Flour005 cropped

Articles of Incorporation from the Incorporation Case Files, filed September 20, 1911.

In 1923, a new mill and elevator, reportedly costing half a million dollars to build, was established at 400 West 500 South.

Husler Flour Mills, 300 West (400 West today) 500 South, circa 1937.

Husler Flour Mills, 400 West 500 South, circa 1937.

Tax Appraisal Cards, circa 1937.

Tax Appraisal Cards showing plot plan of mill buildings, circa 1937.

Now named Salt Lake Flour mill, 400 West 500 South, circa 1957.

Now named the Salt Lake Flour mills, 400 West 500 South, circa 1957.

The mill went through several different names through the years, but in 1968 Colorado Milling and Elevator was purchased by the Peavey Company, a family-held, Minneapolis-based grain merchandising and processing firm (now owned by ConAgra). According to Salt Lake County Tax Appraisal Records in 1977, the Peavey Company had an operations engineer review the mill which revealed that the south side of the mill had settled and required maintenance.

New name and new owners. Circa 1977.

New name and new owners. Circa 1977.

A listing of the automobiles owned by Husler Milling and Elevator in 1932 is revealed through a Taxpayer’s List of Automobiles, a record created by the Salt Lake County Assessor:

Listing of automobiles owned by the New Husler Flour Mills, 1932.

Listing of automobiles owned by the New Husler Flour Mills, 1932.

Also available at the Archives are records of taxes paid (1853-2011).  Through these records the mill’s history can continue to be documented up to the present, as shown by this sample tax record for the mill from 1977-1983.

Excerpt from Tax Ledger, 1977-1983. Peavey Company of Minneapolis owned Colorado Milling and Elevator.

Excerpt from Tax Ledger, 1977-1983. (Peavey Company of Minneapolis owned Colorado Milling and Elevator).

Many other records are also available that could help you to document the story of businesses in Salt Lake County, including Commission Meeting Minutes, Business Licenses (limited), and Business Affidavits.  Additional great sources outside of the Salt Lake County Archives include the Utah History Research Center and Utah Digital Newspapers.

Sources for images, top to bottom:

Salt Lake County Incorporation Case Files, file 6168. Series CL-021.

Salt Lake County Tax Appraisal Cards and Photographs, serial 1-1186; parcel 15-01-376-003. Series AS-072.

Salt Lake County Taxpayer’s List of Automobiles, (2) packets for the New Husler Flour Mills, 1932. Series AS-386.

Salt Lake County Tax Ledgers, serial 1-1186, 1977-1983. Series TR-063.

Thanks for reading this far!  Check out the mill as it exists today!

This entry was posted in Resources for research, Salt Lake history, Utah history and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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