Glimpse of the Granary District

Salt Lake City’s Granary District covers roughly 19 blocks, stretching east to West Temple, north to 600 South, with the western and southern boundaries marked by I-15.  The area is currently going through a revitalization of both commercial and community spirit.

As defined by the granarydistrict.org website:

“It’s a hard-working neighborhood. It grew up around the railroad — light and heavy industry, warehouses and silos — but as the railroad moved west, many of the businesses moved with it. Today, the ones that stayed are thriving and rubbing elbows with artists, restauranteurs, entrepreneurs, and pioneering young families who’ve flocked to fill in the spaces. Of course … the buildings worked as hard as the people, and today the neighborhood is blessed with a heritage of warehouse and industrial spaces begging to be renewed and reborn — and to be put back to work.”

This neighborhood also once contained many residential buildings with a history all of their own.  Many were built in the late 1800s, housing generations of families.

If you walked down 300 West (which used to be 200 West) in the 1930s, these are some of the houses that you would have seen:

703 South 200 (now 300) West, circa 1936.

703 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1918.

711 South 200 (now 300) West, circa

711 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1900.

717 South 200 (now 300) West, photo taken in 1936; house built circa 1884.

717 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1884.

721 South 200 (now 300) West. Photo taken in 1936.

721 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1899; demolished in 1987.

725 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1900.

725 South 200 (now 300) West in 1936. House built circa 1900.

Note: Our previous blog entry about the Husler Milling and Elevator Company gives you an idea about the history of this area (and its name). The mill is located just outside of the official Granary District boundaries.

This entry was posted in Lost Houses, Salt Lake history and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Glimpse of the Granary District

  1. Pingback: More Than Just Pickles | Salt Lake County Archives

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